Category: fundraising

THIS is what community looks like!

Well, folks – we had one heck of a fun Friday night with you last weekend! It was truly a great way to celebrate the success of our Kites for A Cause summer series and launch us into fall programming. 

Just as a recap – we spent the months of July and August at Spoke Bicycle Cafe with talented local artists Robin Banks and Sarah Farmer , raising awareness about the importance of protecting our local waterways while making art about our hyperlocal environments and community spaces. We had a wonderful time doing river clean-ups, getting to know our neighbors and co-creating our vision for a better Los Angeles. But that’s not all – what we did had a real impact! 

As a result of Kites for A Cause, more than 600 community members were engaged in meaningful action, over 70 lbs of trash were collected from the L.A River and 45 gorgeous works of art were created! We did a lot – and we had fun doing it! 

Check out this video for more about what we did this summer: 

 

 If you participated in one of our workshops this summer, volunteered your time, attended our Community pARTy, or supported our work in the past – THANK YOU!  Your support and involvement is helping to shape our neighborhoods, communities and world for the better! Special thanks to everyone at Spoke Bicycle Cafe for hosting us ❤️

Here’s some photos from the event! 

We’re Throwing a Party!

We’ve wrapped up our Kites for a Cause summer programming, (check out pics here) and we’re ready for a party! 😎

RSVP HERE

Come kick off the back-to-school season with a family-friendly art party and FUNdraiser at Spoke Bicycle Cafe in Frogtown, Friday, September 20th, 6-9pm. 

Here’s what we’ve got planned:

🦋Exhibition of community-based fabric art from our summer workshops

👋🏼Meet and greet with the teaching artists behind the exhibit, Robin Banks and Sarah Farmer

🎟Raffle (great prizes for both kids and their adults, too!) 

🎨Interactive neon-mural activity (come ready to paint!) 

🎧Family-friendly music and dance party

🍻Food and beverages available for purchase (Adult-friendly and otherwise 😎) 

MÚCARO for Puerto Rico

The real purpose of MÚCARO for Puerto Rico’s art education is not necessarily to only create more professional artists, it is to create an opportunity to inspire more Puerto Ricans to be critical thinkers, to keep their minds curious and to continue aspiring to have productive lives.”                          – NiNO Alicea


We’ve got a very exciting announcement to share with you all! 

Our friend, ally and artist mentor El Nino Alicea is launching his latest creative manifestation, MÚCARO for Puerto Rico this month – with RuckusRoots as the official fiscal sponsor! 

You may remember our collaboration on MÚCARO from back in 2017. The installation was that year’s Burning Man Honoraria Art Grant recipient, representing the first full-scale piece on the Playa by a Puerto Rican artist. As you know, the recent hurricanes have caused catastrophic damage to the community, the economy and to the infrastructure of this small island. Now in 2019, we are creating a new version of MÚCARO on the island of Puerto Rico itself! The mission of this new installation is to utilize our creative skills to help with rebuilding efforts, lift and empower the local economy, and provide a space of healing, education, and inspiration to community members for years to come. 

RuckusRoots is especially excited about this last aspect of the project. In addition to sponsoring MÚCARO for Puerto Rico, we will be providing curriculum development for the public programming that will be hosted at the site. This public space will be used as a classroom to educate people on practical skills to aid in rebuilding efforts such as roofing or solar panel installation. In addition, we hope to foster relationships with local artists and community members who can offer their skills and creativity to others in a variety of contexts.

All Puerto Ricans have been impacted by this natural disaster, and this project aims to harness the power and resilience of this community to not only construct the piece itself, but also enjoy the art and draw inspiration from this collaborative installation in the future. 

Thanks for your continued support as we work to make sustainable and creative education available to a wider audience; we hope you’ll share our excitement as we proceed with this incredible project in Puerto Rico! If you’d like to donate to help fund the owl build, you can click the button below! 

Thank you! 

Animation Video: Where Your Donation Dollars Go…

 

DONATE now

In 2018 over 4,000 single-use plastic bags were diverted from Los Angeles streets and over 500 underserved youth had access to quality sustainable arts education thanks to donors like you.

Our 2019 programs will provide opportunities in both classrooms and public workshops to empower Angelenos of all ages in three areas: visual arts, ecology and creative reuse. Our goal is to reach 600 students and divert another 12,000 single-use plastic bags from the environment. Even though we helped over 500 students last year, LA is still home to thousands of youth without access to arts education, and hundreds of miles of littered and polluted streets.  

Your donation dollars have huge impact on our work:

$1 = 1 plastic bag diverted from landfill and turned into art

$2 = 1 hour of quality arts education for 1 student

$3 = 1 square foot of beautiful mural for an underserved community in LA

 

Case Study

Wild Art in at Eucalyptus Elementary School

We completed our latest Wild Art program at Eucalyptus Elementary School in Hawthorne, CA with nearly 200 3rd-4th graders. Your donations will go towards continuing the program with 5th graders next spring, and towards installing the mural of student paintings on campus. In Wild Art, student-artists gain visual art skills while learning about local wildlife and important creative reuse methods that can help protect endangered species in our city. The program has already diverted 4,000 plastic bags from landfill.

Here’s what Hawthorne Fine Arts Commissioner Danielle Marquez has to say about the program: 

And here’s a blog with pictures: https://ruckusroots.org/wild-art-program-at-eucalyptus-elementary/

Thank you for your continued support of our work! 

 

How Does Educating Girls Help Heal the Planet?

In order to answer the question posed in the title of this blog, we’re going to walk you through the Community Listening Project, which wrapped up last week at Lifeline Charter School in Compton, CA. 

We were both challenged and inspired throughout this semester-long program, and learned a lot along the way! As you may know, RuckusRoots usually runs larger-scale programs and events, so this project provided a rare chance to work closely with a small group of young teen girls through our partnership with Girls, Inc .

Our focus in this program was to teach the girls about the power of listening, research and data collection. We wanted to explore the idea that when opinions are backed up by fact, your voice can be even more powerful! Artistically, the girls learned photography and graphic design skills, and used them to create protest posters about their research topics.

Our work began at the beginning of the spring school semester, and we launched right in with a film screening of “Little Stones” by rising filmmaker Sophia Kruz, which follows the lives of four women using their creativity to improve the lives of their peers and empower them to fight gender oppression. We spent hours talking about how art can be harnessed as a tool for social change, discussed some examples of this, and asked each other what we most wanted to see changed in our local communities. As this program was all about listening, we quickly learned through classroom interviews and surveys with the local community that the topic of SELF-LOVE was something the girls wanted to address as a theme. The idea of self-love encompasses many of the smaller issues and concerns that the girls wanted to explore, like bullying, gender stereotypes, body image and beauty standards. 

How does this relate to sustainability? We asked ourselves this same question. The concept of “self-love” is a complex social issue that speaks to happiness and quality-of-life, both of which are important factors in creating sustainable communities. And when we delved deeper into many of the issues faced by girls and women around the world today, we found some illuminating research.  When girls are taught to value, support and encourage themselves and each other, they are more likely to grow up into empowered young women. And guess what? Women like this are one of the most constructive forces to levy social change, according to environmentalist and best-selling author Paul Hawken. Research shows that educated and engaged women have greater economic independence, happier, healthier, more productive families, and contribute to lower mortality rates worldwide. They can be more effective stewards of food, soil, trees, and water. In fact, Project Drawdown rates the education of women and girls as the 6th most effective action we can take as a society to reverse the current climate crisis! 

We truly enjoyed seeing the participants come up with creative and insightful ideas on their chosen topic of self-love. Drawing inspiration from our class discussions of street art, photography and protest art, the girls learned to illustrate their thoughts visually. Working first on paper to sketch and lay out their ideas, they then worked with several design apps to create their finished posters. They turned out beautifully! We even drew inspiration from these designs and turned them into T-shirts!

 Scroll down for a sampling of completed student posters, photos from the program, and an info graphic revealing the results and discoveries of the girls’ research. We took these results and posters to local school leaders to address the identified issues of bullying and suicide among teen girls in Compton, and successfully advocated for a no-tolerance bulling policy at the school.

We will be sharing stories from the program and posters at Story Bazaar, on Sunday June 24th – join us! 

To learn more about this program, visit our Community Listening Project page.